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Spring 2014 | Elizabeth Pandolfi

 

“…Then there’s the Rebekah Jacob Gallery on upper King Street, which is setting the gold standard for high-value Southern photography in the region. Owner Rebekah Jacob is a passionate curator who seeks out rare, high-quality works—this past summer, she acquired a dye transfer print of photographer William Eggleston’s “Red Ceiling,” another print of which hangs in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Other photographers Jacob represents include William Christenberry and Kathleen Robbins, and she maintains a small roster of painters and sculptors as well.”

 

Read more in Art & Antiques magazine

the essential guide

April 2014 | Leah Rhyne

 the essential guide

“On upper King street in charleston, there’s no single gallery that can match the astronomical growth of the Rebekah Jacob Gallery. In the past year alone her gallery reached over $3 million in inventory, and brought in such southern hardball artists as William Eggleston, Richard Sexton, and William Christenberry. according to Jacob, the main focus of the gallery remains “showing contemporary artists of the American South,” and she has accomplished that goal. Now she’s headed out on the road, carrying her clients’ work to art fairs around the world.”

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Arrested Motion | Kevin Taylor INNER WILDERNESS @ RJG

December 2013 | Sleepboy

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Currently in Charleston, South Carolina at the Rebekah Jacob Gallery, painter Kevin E. Taylor (seen with the gallery owner below) is holding a solo exhibition entitled Inner Wilderness. For this showing, the Bay Area-based artist has presented a diverse selection of large scale work including his depictions of the natural world rendered with architectural elements as well as pieces where the animals from different paintings are in communication with each other…

Read more at, ARRESTEDMOTION.COM

Charleston City Paper | Kevin Taylor INNER WILDERNESS at Rebekah Jacob Gallery

November 2013 | Melissa Tunstall

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 On a wall in the Rebekah Jacob Gallery appears the phrase: 

“We are nature, and nature is indistinguishable from us on so many levels”

An idea that embodies painter Kevin Taylor‘s new exhibit INNER WILDERNESS, which features the animals that Taylor has become known for. In this latest exhibit, his animal paintings have taken on a new dimension.

Rebekah Jacob believes the realism comes from Taylor’s illustration background. Taylor attended the Savannah College of Art and Design majoring in illustration and took his first painting class his senior year. He draws first, then paints, and he plays with dimensions and brush strokes.

 INNER WILDERNESS encompasses numerous contradictions. The show uses neutral colors but does not appear muted. There is a lightness in the paintings, but an overwhelming sense of heaviness in the subject matter. And the majority of the subjects are animals yet are personified. It’s these paradoxes that make the work so interesting.

Read more in, CHARLESTON CITY PAPER

Charleston Living Magazine | Rebekah Jacob: The Professional

July 2013 | Jason A. Zwiker

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When her car broke down in Mississippi, she bought artIt was what she was there to do.

This is what you must understand about Rebekah Jacob. She does not stop. Throw an obstacle in her path and she’ll simply size it up, find a way around, and keep going. So while the mechanics did their work, she did her own.

Defining Jacob is a daunting task. Imagine a top-tier curator, fine art appraiser, and Indiana Jones all rolled up into one person. Then take into account that she is a dedicated runner who often plans exhibits down to the finest detail while the miles slip by under her feet. On top of all that, add in the fact that she’s still amazingly young for someone so accomplished.

That’s the exciting part: to have someone as young as her who can actually acquire such rare and high-valued collections,” says Baron Hanson. “She’s come to the point, within eight years, where she can show a work like ‘Red Ceiling’ by William Eggleston.”

To put that into perspective, consider this: in the Spring of 2013, copies of ‘Red Ceiling’ were held by the Museum of Modern Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum (not currently on view), and Rebekah Jacob Gallery, in Charleston. That’s not a long list.

Read more in,  CHARLESTON LIVING MAGAZINE

Charleston City Paper | Somewhere in the South: A Celebration of Southern Photographers at Rebekah Jacob Gallery

June 2013 | Elizabeth Pandolfi

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If those Southern culture geeks at the Oxford American got wind of this show, they’d be singing its praises for days. Rebekah Jacob’s latest exhibition, Somewhere in the South, is a celebration of Southern beauty at its most honest, with all the grit and grime that entails. “There is a flavor, style, and aesthetic to Southern photography that is distinctive and memorable,” says Jacob.

The show will include works by photographers William Eggleston, William Christenberry, Jerry Siegel, Eliot Dudik, Kathleen Robbins, Richard Sexton, Anne Rowland, and Keliy Anderson-Staley. The opening reception will be the first chance to see this collection of unique images portraying local culture at its prettiest, quirkiest, and most unsentimental.

“The American South is raw, zesty, natural, and spicier than other more manicured regions,Jacob says. “Southern images unfold and keep unfolding in a manner unique to this part of the country.”

Read more in, CHARLESTON CITY PAPER

Southern Fine Art Photography | John N. Wall on Emerging Southern Photographers at RJG

 June 2013 | John N. Wall

SOUTHERN FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY

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Red Ceiling, William Eggleston

The Blog About Fine Art Photography in the American South

The Very Best Blog on Southern Photography We Could Wish For.”
(Nancy McCrady; Publisher, SXSE Magazines)

In Charleston, also opening on June 1st at the Rebekah Jacob Gallery is a major show of Southern photographers past and present, with the title  Somewhere in the South: A Celebration of Southern Photographers. This show is up through July 31, 2013. Rebekah Jacob is getting very positive responses to her current show Somewhere in the South | A Celebration of Southern Photographers, up at her gallery in Charleston, SC through July 31st, 2013.

As part of this show, Jacob invited emerging Southern photographers to submit work for an online exhibition, Somewhere in the South: Emerging Photographers, which is now up here, also through July 31st.

Read more at John N. Wall‘s Blog, SOUTHERN FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY

Charleston City Paper | Rebekah Jacob and Charleston’s Fine Art Boom

June 2013 | Leah Rhyne

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The Rebekah Jacob Gallery‘s recent acquisition of an extremely rare print by photographer William Eggleston is a sign of the times for the Lowcountry’s thriving fine art scene.

In early June at the Rebekah Jacob Gallery on Upper King Street, the curtains opened on a new show. Called Somewhere in the South, the show is a celebration of Southern photography and features works by such notable artists as William Eggleston, Richard Sexton, and William Christenberry. The highlight of the show is an exceptional Eggleston piece called “The Red Ceiling,” a dye transfer print of a photograph so rarely printed that it also hangs in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan. And now it hangs here, in Charleston.

Clearly, this is not your typical Charleston art show. But then, what’s “typical” of art in Charleston is rapidly changing….

Read more in, CHARLESTON CITY PAPER

American Way Magazine | Art Collecting-101, with Rebekah Jacob

May 2013 | Eileen Fritsch

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Understand how to build value. 

Knowing what future collectors will want is impossible, so you can’t assume that you will be able to resell your art at a higher price later. The best way to start a collection that might appreciate in value over a long period of time is to work with reputable, knowledgeable dealers who will help you buy quality art at fair prices.

        “Buy the best artwork you can afford,” advises Rebekah Jacob of the Rebekah Jacob Gallery in Charleston, S.C.

        “Look at the artist’s credentials, publications, exhibitions, gallery representation and collector base. The more dense the artist’s résumé, often the more solid the investment”

Owning fine art is different than owning gold, stocks or bonds,Jacob also emphasizes.

          “Art isn’t a commodity that can be liquidated quickly, and it must be cared for and displayed properly. Expenses such as storage, insurance, climate control and framing come into play.”

Some gallery ­clients never intend to sell the pieces they buy. Instead, they plan to pass their art down to the next generation or donate it to museums. Also, documenting details about the art can make it more attractive to potential buyers. Save all receipts, certificates of authenticity, artist statements, gallery brochures and exhibit catalogs.

Read more in, AMERICAN WAY MAGAZINE

Southern Fine Art Photography | John N. Wall on RJG Southern Photography

May 2013 | John N. Wall

SOUTHERN FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY9 Southern Fine Art Photography | John N. Wall on RJG Southern Photography

The Blog About Fine Art Photography in the American South

The Very Best Blog on Southern Photography We Could Wish For.”
-(Nancy McCrady; Publisher, SXSE Magazines)

In Charleston, also opening on June 1st at the Rebekah Jacob Gallery is a major show of Southern photographers past and present, with the title  Somewhere in the South: A Celebration of Southern Photographers. This show is up through July 31, 2013. 

This show features work by distinguished Southern photographers William Eggleston, William Christenberry, Jerry Siegel, Eliot Dudik (see image), Kathleen Robbins, Richard Sexton, Anne Rowland, and Keliy Anderson-Staley.

We are deeply in Jacobs’ debt for reminding us through this work of the importance of photography in documenting for all time the crises that define Southern history and culture…

Read More at John N. Wall’s Blog, SOUTHERN FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY

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    Photographic Firepower of the Cuban Revolution | by Rebekah Jacob

    By Rebekah Jacob Armed with their camera bags, a small group of revolutionaries had photographic firepower, documenting Cuba’s most dramatic period.  These photojournalists—Alberta Korda, Raúl Corralles, Osvaldo Salas and, his son, Roberto Salas—were Fidel Castro’s chosen ones, who not only photographed social changes, but who themselves inspired change.  In positions of trust, they were beside [...]

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